For Patients For Caregivers For Medical Professionals

HELPLINE 1-800-465-4837
Mon-Fri 9am – 5pm EST

Your Liver & COVID-19

Resources for Coping with COVID-19

US MapSelect your state for more up-to-the-minute news, information and resources about the COVID-19 worldwide pandemic near you.

US State Resource Centers for the COVID-19 Coronavirus

The U.S. Public Health Service is actively working to address the threat from coronavirus. Below, please find official updates from federal public health agencies on this topic. This information covers research, public health, and coverage and access issues and is intended to educate you and help keep you safe.

What's a respiratory droplet?

Ever seen someone cough or sneeze who doesn’t cover their mouth? You’ve likely seen a spray of fluids come out of their mouth. Gross, we know. If that person is infected with something like COVID-19, all those little drops can contain infection or viruses; thankfully, this spray only travels a short distance before settling. That is why social distancing and handwashing frequently and thoroughly is so important! Recently published data shows:

  • Respiratory drops can remain in the air and infect someone for up to 30 minutes
  • Surfaces may remain contaminated for up to 3 days

Share this page
FacebooktwitterlinkedinmailFacebooktwitterlinkedinmail
rssrss

When can a person spread this virus?

Right now, we believe that people are most contagious when they are experiencing symptoms and at their sickest. Some spread may be possible when someone doesn’t have any symptoms. There are some reports of this happening, but this does not seem to be the main way the virus spreads.


Share this page
FacebooktwitterlinkedinmailFacebooktwitterlinkedinmail
rssrss

Why is social distancing so important? I don't feel sick, why should I distance from my friends and family?

Social distancing can reduce and slow the spread of this virus. By keeping 6 feet between people, you reduce your risk of becoming sick yourself. If you avoid getting sick, you can also protect others, like family members who may be at a higher risk than you. Juan Delcan, a visual artist, created the animation, below, to show how social distancing can help slow and stop the spread of COVID-19 and save lives. As you can see, without proper social distance the virus can spread rapidly.

 


Share this page
FacebooktwitterlinkedinmailFacebooktwitterlinkedinmail
rssrss

How do I know if I'm at an increased risk of becoming more sick because of COVID-19?

The CDC is currently listing the following people as being at high-risk for severe illness from COVID-19:

  • People aged 65 years and older
  • People who live in a nursing home or long-term care facility
  • People of any age with the following:
    • Chronic Lung Disease: moderate to severe asthma, emphysema, COPD
    • Diabetes Mellitus: Type 1, Type 2, and Gestational (related to pregnancy)
    • Cardiovascular (or heart) Disease
    • Chronic Renal (or kidney) Disease, particularly if not well-controlled
    • Chronic Liver Disease, particularly if not well-controlled
    • Immunocompromised Condition including but not limited to:
      • Cancer Treatment
      • Bone Marrow or Organ Transplant
      • Immune Deficiencies
      • Poorly controlled HIV or AIDS
      • Prolonged use of corticosteroids (like prednisone) or other immune weakening medications
    • Severe obesity
    • Pregnancy (people who are pregnant are known to be at risk with severe viral illness)
    • Current or Former Smoker

Share this page
FacebooktwitterlinkedinmailFacebooktwitterlinkedinmail
rssrss

I have to go to the grocery store! What should I do?

Be careful and be smart. If you can, wipe down and disinfect your shopping cart. Use hand sanitizer while in the store and be sure to avoid touching your face. When you return home, wash your hands. If you’re very worried or at risk, you may want to disinfect products as you unpack them before putting them away. Everyone should dispose of one time use bags immediately or wipe down reusable bags. Wash your hands immediately after you finish putting away your groceries.

 

Here is a helpful resource from Harvard Public Health


Share this page
FacebooktwitterlinkedinmailFacebooktwitterlinkedinmail
rssrss

When was COVID-19 discovered?

For many people, it might feel like you just started hearing about this virus and disease. Here’s a helpful timeline to understand the when this started and how it spread:

COVID-19 Timeline


Share this page
FacebooktwitterlinkedinmailFacebooktwitterlinkedinmail
rssrss

What do I do if I feel sick or think I have COVID-19?

  • Stay Home, Call a Doctor. If you have mild symptoms, stay home. Do not go to work, school, public places, use public transportation, or be close to people. If you have very bad symptoms and feel you need to be seen by a doctor, call before you go. Describe what your symptoms are and listen to the instructions. Call your doctor before you go anywhere. If it is a medical emergency, call 911 and tell them your symptoms and possible risks (like recent travel history or contact with someone who has the virus).
  • Know your risks. Have you had close contact with someone diagnosed with COVID-19? What are your symptoms (fever, cough, difficulty breathing)? Do you have a chronic disease that might make you at risk of becoming more sick? It’s important you share this information, to the best of your ability, with the medical professional you consult.
  • Listen to your doctor. Based on the information you tell your doctor, you will be told what to do next. Next steps may include:
    • Keeping track of your symptoms and informing your doctor’s office if you have new or worsening symptoms.
    • Being seen by a doctor to be evaluated in person. If you can, go alone to your appointment to avoid exposing anyone else.
    • Going to a clinic or hospital.
  • Protect Others.
    • If you need to leave your home to be seen by a doctor, wear a mask to avoid infecting other people. Healthy people should not wear masks but if you are sick you want to reduce exposure to other people.
    • Sneeze or cough into the bend of your elbow or use a tissue and throw it away immediately.
    • Distance yourself from others and following instructions for isolation or quarantine.
  • Stay Calm. It can be really scary to think you are sick with a contagious illness or to be sick with a new illness. Every day, throughout our country and world, we are learning more about COVID-19. We are all in this together.

Share this page
FacebooktwitterlinkedinmailFacebooktwitterlinkedinmail
rssrss

Can I get COVID-19 from touching a surface?

Yes, it is possible a person can get COVID-19 if they touch a surface with the virus on it and then tough their face, mouth, nose, or eyes. New data suggests the virus may be able to live on contaminated surface for up to 3 days. That’s why washing your hands thoroughly and frequently, especially after touching something, is so important. Here is a helpful video that explains how this can happen

 


Share this page
FacebooktwitterlinkedinmailFacebooktwitterlinkedinmail
rssrss

What are the symptoms of COVID-19?

Most people who become sick with COVID-19 feel similar symptoms to the flu: fever, cough, and shortness of breath. Most people will recover from these symptoms with rest and proper care at home (drinking lots of fluids, taking over-the-counter medicine as instructed by your doctor, etc.); recovery may take several days, or even a week or two. Be sure to call your doctor if you feel sick and follow their specific instruction. Remember, everybody’s health is different!

Some people are risk of having more severe, or worse, symptoms with this infection. Those people at a higher-risk will need to monitor themselves closely and, if they start to experience any sort of flu-like symptoms, should call their doctor’s office immediately, even if symptoms are mild.


Share this page
FacebooktwitterlinkedinmailFacebooktwitterlinkedinmail
rssrss

If I become sick and must be isolated, how will I know when I have recovered?

It’s important to follow CDC guidelines, and listen to your doctor and local health department to decide when to stop home isolation. According to the CDC, you have recovered if it has been at least 7 days since your symptoms started, if you have not had a fever for 3 days and haven’t been taking fever-reducing medicine, and if symptoms like cough and shortness of breath have improved. But again, even the CDC says you should listen to your doctor and local health officials as every community is experiencing COVID-19 differently.


Share this page
FacebooktwitterlinkedinmailFacebooktwitterlinkedinmail
rssrss

Children with Liver Disease Living Through COVID 19
Hosted by the American Liver Foundation with the generous support of CSP Networks and Gilead Sciences, this webinar features a presentation by Dr. Rohit Kohli of Children’s Hospital Los Angeles on Children with Liver Disease living through COVID 19.


COVID-19 and Fatty Liver Disease
Hosted by the American Liver Foundation with the generous support of CSP Networks, Gilead Sciences and Intercept Pharmaceuticals, this webinar features a presentation by Dr. Mazen Noureddin of Cedars Sinai Medical Center on COVID-19 and Fatty Liver Disease.


8 Questions for an Infectious Disease Specialist about COVID-19
Dr. Ramers and Dr. Frenette from the American Liver Foundation Pacific Coast Division answer questions about Coronavirus. Dr. Catherine Frenette, ALF National Medical Advisory Committee Member and Chair of the ALF Pacific Coast Division’s Medical Advisory Committee recently sat down with Infectious Disease Specialist Dr. Christian Ramers of the University of California San Diego School of Medicine to answer 8 Questions about COVID-19 that we all want to know.


Update on COVID-19 (Part 1)
In the first part of a two-part series, Dr. Tamar Taddei, Associate Professor of Medicine (Digestive Diseases) at Yale Medicine and Co-Chair of the American Liver Foundation’s National Medical Advisory Committee provides the latest update for liver patients and their families about COVID-19. She then devotes a considerable amount of time to answering liver-specific questions from attendees.


Update on COVID-19 (Part 2)
In the second part of our COVID-19 Update Series, Dr. Emmanuel Thomas, ALF National Board Member and professor at University of Miami’s Miller School of Medicine provides a broader understanding of the COVID-19, testing and why the virus is so unique. This recorded presentation is for patients, caregivers, medical professionals, or those just interested in taking a deeper dive on the issue.

Care of Chronic Liver Disease Patients During the COVID-19 Pandemic
Hosted by the American Liver Foundation with the generous support of CSP Networks and Gilead Sciences, this webinar features a presentation by Dr. Mohamed El Kabany of the Pfleger Institute on caring for Chronic Liver Disease Patients During the COVID-19 Pandemic.


COVID-19 and Liver Patients
Dr. Sammy Saab, Medical Director at the Pfleger Liver Institute shares insights for liver patients regarding the COVID-19 coronavirus. This webinar is brought to you by the American Liver Foundation with the support of Gilead Sciences.


Mind-Body Webinar
We could all use a little calm in our lives, and in this video, American Liver Foundation New England Division’s Lindsay Ventura leads a webinar to provide emotional, physical and psychological self-management techniques. She reviews different types of self-management and practice relaxation techniques like visualization and progressive muscle relaxation.


Coronavirus and the Liver (Part 1)
In this video Dr. Sammy Saab from David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA gives an overview of COVID-19 (Coronavirus) and answers your questions in the first of the ALF Coronavirus series.


Coronavirus and the Liver (Part 2)
In this video Dr. Sammy Saab from David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA gives an overview of COVID-19 (Coronavirus) and answers your questions in the second of the ALF Coronavirus series.


Spread of COVID-19 in the Latino Community and Latino Liver Patients
Dr. Edward Mena, Medical Director of Pasadena Liver Center and President & CEO of California Liver Research Institute shares insights for liver patients in the latino community regarding the COVID-19 coronavirus. This webinar is brought to you by the American Liver Foundation with the support of Gilead Sciences.

Healthy Eating at Home with Jessica Dean
Making and eating healthy food can be difficult, especially during the current crisis when you’re stuck at home. Registered Dietitian Jessica Dean makes things easier by talking about which foods to buy, how to use them, alternative options, freezing foods, batch cooking, using canned products/reducing sodium. She also discusses eating habits during stressful times and answers some of the questions about nutrition we’ve received over the last few weeks from the liver community. It’s a helpful presentation you don’t want to miss!


COVID-19 & Liver Transplantation
Dr. Burton shares his expertise on this educational video and provides information about COVID-19 and Liver Transplantation. Dr. James Burton, Medical Director of Liver Transplantation at UCHealth in Denver, Colorado. Dr. Burton specializes in transplant hepatology, gastroenterology, internal medicine and liver disorders. Dr. Burton is the Medical Director of the Medicine Specialties Unit at University of Colorado, as well as the Program Director of Transplant Hepatology Fellowship and the Interim Director of Hepatology. He serves on the Rocky Mountain Medical Advisory Committee Board of the American Liver Foundation and has been serving the liver community for over 20 years.


Carley V Thanks You!
ALF Blogger and Patient Advocate Carley Vogel explains why social distancing is so important to her condition and the greater good of society!


May 1, 2020

Being a Caregiver During COVID-19
Presented by Transplant Social Worker Kim Kisil and Caregiver Deb Tully


April 16, 2020

COVID-19 and Liver Transplantation
Presented by Dr. Burton
WATCH HERE


April 13, 2020

8 Questions for an Infectious Disease Specialist about COVID-19
Presented by Drs. Frenette and Ramers
WATCH HERE


April 6, 2020

COVID-19 Update for Liver Patients and Families, Part 2
Presented by Dr. Emmanuel Thomas
WATCH HERE


March 31, 2020

COVID-19 Update for Liver Patients and Families, Part 1
Presented by Dr. Tamar Taddei
WATCH HERE


March 26, 2020

Facebook Live: Healthy Eating at Home
Presented by Dietitian and Health Coach Jessica Dean
WATCH HERE


March 24, 2020

Webinar: Mind-Body Wellness
Presented by Lindsay Ventura, ALF New England
WATCH HERE


March 20, 2020

Webinar: Coronavirus and the Liver (Part 1)
Presented by Dr. Sammy Saab
WATCH HERE


March 20, 2020

Webinar: Coronavirus and the Liver (Part 2)
Presented by Dr. Sammy Saab
WATCH HERE


American Liver Foundation Helpline

Phone: 1-800-GO-Liver (1-800-465-4837)
Open 9am-7pm ET, Monday-Friday

Chat: Click on red tab on the bottom of any page on our website to begin


American Liver Foundation Online Support Groups

ALF PBC Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/ALF.PBCSupportGroup/
Open to PBC patients and caregivers; must have Facebook account to join

ALF NASH Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/282616099043047/
Open to NASH patients and caregivers; must have Facebook account to join

Inspire ALF online liver disease support community: https://www.inspire.com/groups/american-liver-foundation/
Open to all interested parties; must create free, secure account to participate


American Liver Foundation COVID-19 & Liver Disease Blog

COVID-19 & Liver Disease


Hotlines

SAMHSA Disaster Distress Helpline

  • 1-800-985-5990
  • Text “TalkWithUS” to 66746
  • Toll-free, multilingual, immediate crisis counseling for people experiencing emotional distress related to any disaster
  • Available 24/7, 365 days/year

Parental Stress Line

  • 1-800-632-8188
  • Toll-free, multilingual, confidential and anonymous helpline for parents
  • Available 24/7, 365 days/year

 

5 Ways to Manage Stress During the Coronavirus Outbreak (Cleveland Clinic)

Stress and Coping (CDC)

Coping with stress during the 2019-nCoV outbreak (WHO)


Free Online Meetings and Virtual Platforms


How to Explain COVID-19 to Kids and Healthy Parenting during COVID

* multilingual sites/handouts

Outbreaks, Epidemics, and Pandemics

On March 11, 2020, the World Health Organization declared COVID-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus, a pandemic. Prior, the disease was designated an epidemic. What is the difference?

  • Outbreak: a sudden increase in the number of people sick with a disease. Outbreaks last for different lengths of time and can impact a community or a much larger geographic area. For example, every year we anticipate an outbreak of the flu. We can protect ourselves from becoming infected with the flu by using a vaccine. Vaccines reduce the number of people who get sick and result in a smaller, shorter outbreak.
  • Epidemic: an outbreak of disease that spreads quickly and affects many individuals at the same time.
  • Pandemic: an epidemic which spreads over a greater geographic area, often worldwide, and impacts an exceptionally high amount of the population. Pandemics often involve a new virus or a strain of a virus that is not commonly seen. When there is a new virus or a new strain, humans have little to no immunity and the virus can spread easily. Pandemics have social and economic impact in addition to the impact on human health.
  • Has this ever happened before? There have been many pandemics and epidemics throughout history with varying death tolls. The Bubonic or Black Plague, Spanish Flu, HIV/AIDS, and, now, COVID-19. Here is a helpful Infographic to learn more about the history of pandemics and provide some context to this rapidly evolving situation.

Share this page
FacebooktwitterlinkedinmailFacebooktwitterlinkedinmail
rssrss

Coronavirus v. COVID

  • Coronavirus: coronaviruses are a group of viruses named for the crown like spikes on their surface. There are several types of coronaviruses that can infect people. People around the world are regularly infected by the four known human coronaviruses (229E, NL63, OC43, and HKU1). These viruses cause mild illness, like the common cold. Coronaviruses can infect animals, evolve to infect humans, and become new, or novel, coronaviruses. Three recent examples are:
    • MERS-CoV: a coronavirus that causes Middle East Respiratory Syndrome or MERS)
    • SARS-CoV: a coronavirus that causes severe acute respiratory syndrome or SARS
    • SARS-CoV-2: the new, novel, coronavirus that causes coronavirus disease 2019 or COVID-19
  • COVID-19: the newly identified (or novel) coronavirus causes the disease COVID-19 (COronaVIrus Disease 2019). It is suspected that this virus began infecting animals, changed, then started to infect humans. COVID-19 was initially linked to a live animal market in China but is now spreading from person-to-person throughout the world.

Share this page
FacebooktwitterlinkedinmailFacebooktwitterlinkedinmail
rssrss

Understanding Transmission of a Virus

During an outbreak, public health specialists work to identify who is sick, their symptoms, when they got sick, and where they might have gotten sick. Every virus spreads, or transmits, differently. By gathering this data and doing a process called contact tracing, public health officials are better able to control the disease. Some viruses are highly contagious, meaning they spread very quickly and easily from one person to another. Measles are an example of a highly contagious virus. Another important difference between viruses is if the virus spreads continually without stopping, which is called a sustained spread.


Share this page
FacebooktwitterlinkedinmailFacebooktwitterlinkedinmail
rssrss

Contact Tracing

Contact TracingContact tracing work done by the World Health Organization and local officials in China resulted in the current belief that COVID-19 originated in a live market in China. If you look at reports of COVID-19 cases on the website of your local Department of Public Health or Health and Human Services (we have created a map so you can find your state’s COVID-19 information center) you may see information about transmission or how the virus was acquired.

Public health officials rely on contact tracing to control an outbreak. By knowing where someone has been and who they have been around, public health officials can identify individuals that may have been exposed to the virus by that person and prevent additional people from becoming infected. In the early days of an outbreak, this is much easier because fewer people are infected. As more and more people become infected, contact tracing becomes much more difficult as the numbers rise exponentially.

This information is important for contact tracing. Here is an infographic which describes what contact tracing is and why it is so important. Click to view enlarged version.


Share this page
FacebooktwitterlinkedinmailFacebooktwitterlinkedinmail
rssrss

Types of Transmission

  • Person to Person: the virus is spreading from one person to another. COVID-19 is thought to spread mainly between individuals who are in close contact with one another (within 6 feet) through the respiratory droplets from someone who is infected when they cough or sneeze. If you are standing close enough, you could inhale those droplets into your lungs and become infected as well. You may also see this as close contact. This sort of a case means we have clearly traced an infection to another individual source.
    • Close contact: being within 6 feet of someone for an extended period of time or when they sneeze or cough.
  • Travel: COVID-19 is now in every single state and most countries. However, there are some states with more cases than others. Travel from a location with many cases results in wider spread of the virus. Travel is an important part of contact tracing. Doctors ask patients about recent travel history if they present with symptoms of COVID-19. This can help them decide if the person is at risk for COVID-19. Also, doctors will need to know where that person has traveled in case they were infectious and spread the virus further. For example, in Massachusetts there were no cases on Martha’s Vineyard, a small island off the coast. However, someone from the mainland traveled to the island and now there are confirmed cases on the island. It is really important to limit travel right now because we will also limit the travel of the virus.
  • Community Spread: many states are experiencing community spread. Community spread means that many people in an area are infected and some do not know how or where they were infected. As of this writing, more than half of the states in the US are reporting community spread. This elevates the risk for everyone in the area and makes the spread of the virus much harder to contain. If you are living somewhere there is community spread, you need to be extra cautious. Check out our FAQs to help you navigate!

Share this page
FacebooktwitterlinkedinmailFacebooktwitterlinkedinmail
rssrss

Presumptive v. Confirmed v. Suspect Cases

  • Presumptive versus Confirmed Cases: testing right now is being done at the state level. When COVID-19 began spreading in the United States, state labs could test someone but were then required to submit the test to the CDC for confirmation. If someone tested positive at a state run lab they were a “presumptive case” and, if the CDC lab confirmed the positive result, that person would then be considered a “confirmed case.” As of March 14, 2020, CDC confirmatory testing was no longer required to consider a positive test done at a state lab confirmed. You may still see presumptive cases listed if a lab that is not run by the state conducted the test; this sample does need to be sent to a state or federal lab for confirmation.
  • Suspect Cases: you may have been heard or read about suspect cases of COVID-19. If someone is showing symptoms of a COVID-19 infection they will be tested for other illness that may cause similar symptoms, like the flu. If they have no other illness that could cause the symptoms and they have had close contact with someone who does have COVID-19 or they live in a country/area where there is community spread happening, they will be considered a suspect case of COVID-19.

Share this page
FacebooktwitterlinkedinmailFacebooktwitterlinkedinmail
rssrss

Underlying or Preexisting Medical Conditions

Some groups have been told they are at a heightened risk for developing complications if they become infected with this virus. It’s hard to know who falls into this category. We have included, below, the CDC’s current listing of underlying health conditions that may put you at a higher risk. If you are unsure or if you are living with chronic disease not listed below, please be sure to contact your doctor with your concerns. The CDC is currently listing the following people as being at high-risk for severe illness from COVID-19:

  • People aged 65 years and older
  • People who live in a nursing home or long-term care facility
  • People of any age with the following:
    • Chronic Lung Disease: moderate to severe asthma, emphysema, COPD
    • Diabetes Mellitus: Type 1, Type 2, and Gestational (related to pregnancy)
    • Cardiovascular (or heart) Disease
    • Chronic Renal (or kidney) Disease, particularly if not well-controlled
    • Chronic Liver Disease
    • Immunocompromised Condition including but not limited to:
      • Cancer Treatment
      • Bone Marrow or Organ Transplant
      • Immune Deficiencies
      • Poorly controlled HIV or AIDS
      • Prolonged use of corticosteroids (like prednisone) or other immune weakening medications
    • Severe obesity (a BMI of 41 or higher)
    • Pregnancy (people who are pregnant are known to be at risk with severe viral illness)
    • Current or Former Smoker

Share this page
FacebooktwitterlinkedinmailFacebooktwitterlinkedinmail
rssrss

Social Distancing

Social Distancing for an Individual: making sure there is distance between you and other people to avoid spreading illness. Staying at least 6 feet away from other people reduces your chances of becoming ill with COVID-19.

Social Distancing for a Community: steps taken to reduce large crowds or gatherings; it is hard to maintain distance at a social gathering or in a crowded space. This might include the following:

  • Cancelling or postponing religious/cultural ceremonies like weddings, baptisms, bat/bar mitzvahs, etc.
  • Working from home/remote instead of going to an office
  • Closing schools or switching to online classes
  • Cancelling or postponing large conferences
  • Limiting the number of people allowed to gather in an area
  • Using tele-medicine for doctors’ appointments instead of in-person appointments

Share this page
FacebooktwitterlinkedinmailFacebooktwitterlinkedinmail
rssrss

Self-Quarantine v. Isolation

Self-Quarantine: someone who has been exposed or who may be sick with COVID-19 might be asked to self-quarantine. This lasts 14 days because two weeks is enough time to know if you will become sick and contagious to other people. After a self-quarantine period has ended, if you don’t have symptoms, follow your doctor’s advice on returning to normal life. If you recently traveled somewhere with a lot of COVID-19 cases or if you have been exposed to an infected person you might be asked to self-quarantine. This involves:

  • Frequent hand washing and standard hygiene
  • Not sharing towels and utensils with others in your household
  • Staying at home
  • No visitors
  • Social distancing from people in your household

Isolation: making sure people who are confirmed to have COVID-10 stay away from those who do not have it. Isolation may happen at home or at a hospital or similar health care setting.


Share this page
FacebooktwitterlinkedinmailFacebooktwitterlinkedinmail
rssrss

Exponential Spread and Flattening the Curve

A lot of people have been talking about Flattening the Curve and Exponential Spread. But what does all of this really mean for COVID-19? This virus spreads quickly and easily in communities. The number of people sick could become very large, very quickly. Using protective measures, like social distancing, self-quarantine, and isolation, are attempts to keep this from happening, or flattening the curve. The curve (line on the graph) shows the number of people getting sick and needing doctors’ assistance or hospitalization. If too many people get really sick, all at once, in a matter of days, hospitals could become overloaded and the health care system would be overwhelmed. This would also mean more people could die because they may not be able to get the help they need. By flattening the curve, the same number of people may get sick but instead of happening all at once, it happens over time, to make sure people can be taken care of as best as possible.

Here is a great video that describes exponential spread, flattening the curve of COVID-19 infections, and what you can do to help your community.

 


Share this page
FacebooktwitterlinkedinmailFacebooktwitterlinkedinmail
rssrss

ALF Medical Advisors on COVID-19 and Liver Disease

In the first part of a two-part series, Dr. Tamar Taddei, Associate Professor of Medicine (Digestive Diseases) at Yale Medicine and Co-Chair of the American Liver Foundation’s National Medical Advisory Committee provides the latest update for liver patients and their families about COVID-19. She then devotes a considerable amount of time to answering liver-specific questions from attendees.

Visit COVID-19 & Liver Disease Blog

What is COVID-19?

Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a respiratory illness that is mainly spread from person to person through people who are in close contact with one anothertouching a surface or object that has the virus on it and then touching their own mouth, nose, or possibly their eyes or from respiratory droplets from an infected persons cough or sneeze. Learn more about how the illness spreads here. 

Older people and those with serious chronic medical conditions, including liver disease patients, are at a higher risk of becoming severely ill from this virus. According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), if a coronavirus outbreak happens in your community, it could last a long time. If you are at a higher risk for serious illness from the coronavirus because you have liver disease, it is important to take actions to reduce your risk of being exposed. These actions may slow the spread and reduce the impact of the disease.  

If you are at higher risk of getting very sick from Coronavirus, you should follow the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) recommendations: 

Speak to your medical team about stocking up on necessary medications. If that is not possible, consider using mail-order prescriptions.  

Buy essential household items and groceries so that you are prepared to stay home if there is an outbreak. 

  • Avoid other people who are sick 
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds
  • If you are unable to wash your hands with soap and water, use hand sanitizer with at least 60 % alcohol
    Avoid touching your face, nose, eyes, etc. 
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces of your home

Try to avoid any area or events with a large number of people, especially areas that are not well ventilated.

Symptoms include fever, cough, sore throat, body aches, headache, chills. If you feel like you are developing symptoms, call your doctor. 

Liver Disease patients should still be attending their regular scheduled medical appointments or ask your doctor if they offer telemedicine consultation as an alternative to a physical clinical visit. If you have any concerns, please contact your healthcare provider 

For liver disease patients and/or transplant recipients, contact your healthcare professional or hepatologist with any questions or concerns regarding travel.

AbbVie
ALF thanks AbbVie for being a 2020 National Gold Sponsor of the American Liver Foundation and its mission.  The American Liver Foundation is solely responsible for the content on this website.  Where content on this site is created by another expert organization, such as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the American Liver Foundation has indicated the author.



ALF thanks Eisai for being a sponsor of our COVID-19 information page.  The American Liver Foundation is solely responsible for the content on this website.  Where content on this site is created by another expert organization, such as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the American Liver Foundation has indicated the author.

Share this page
FacebooktwitterlinkedinmailFacebooktwitterlinkedinmail
rssrss