For Patients Caregiver Tips and Advice For Medical Professionals

26 OCTOBER 2017

Liver Disease Statistics

  • Between 800,000 and 1.4 million people in the United States are living with chronic hepatitis B infection, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). There are approximately 43,000 new hepatitis B cases each year in the U.S. 3
  • About 70% of adults with hepatitis B develop symptoms. 3
  • Between 15%-25% of those with chronic hepatitis B develop serious liver diseases such as cancer, cirrhosis (scarring of the liver), or liver failure, all of which can be fatal. 3
  • In 2013, Asians/Pacific Islanders had the highest hepatitis B-related mortality rate of 2.6 deaths/100,000 population, compared to other race/ethnic groups. Persons aged 55–64 years had the highest age specific mortality rate, 1.8 deaths/100,000 population. 2
  • An estimated 2.7-3.9 million people in the United States have chronic hepatitis C. 1
  • There are approximately 17,000 new hepatitis C cases each year in the U.S. 1
  • As many as 75% of those with chronic HCV in the United States are unaware that they are infected. 1
  • More than 5 million people are living with chronic Hepatitis B or chronic Hepatitis C in the United States. 2
  • Of the three types of viral hepatitis (hepatitis A, B, and C), hepatitis C accounted for the greatest number of deaths and the highest mortality rate, at 5.0 deaths/100,000 population in 2014. 2
  • In 2014, the racial/ethnic group with the highest hepatitis C-related mortality rate was among American Indians/Alaska Natives. 2
  • Of all persons living with HCV infection, about 75% were born during 1945–1965. 1
  • Non-Hispanic Whites accounted for the greatest proportion (69.9%) of past or present hepatitis C cases. 2
  • Each year in the United States, about 21,000 men and 8,000 women get liver cancer, and about 16,000 men and 8,000 women die from the disease. 11
  • Among Asian/Pacific Islander women, liver cancer was the tenth most common cancer and the fifth most common cause of cancer death. 11
  • Among Asian/Pacific Islander men, liver cancer was the fourth most common cancer and the second most common cause of cancer death. 11
  • Among women, Hispanic women had the highest rates of getting liver cancer (7.5 per 100,000 women), followed by Asian/Pacific Islander women (6.8), American Indian/Alaska Native women (6.1), black women (5.3), and white women (3.9). 11
  • Among men, Asian/Pacific Islander men had the highest rates of getting liver cancer (19.1 per 100,000 men), followed by Hispanic† men (19.0), black men (17.0), American Indian/Alaska Native men (12.8), and white men (10.8). 11
  • In 2016, 7,841 liver transplants were performed. 7,496 were from deceased donors and 345 were from living donors. 7
  • To date, 147,842 liver transplants have been performed. 7
  • As of February 3rd, 2016, there are currently 14,380 patients waiting for liver transplants. 7
  • Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and its subtype nonalcoholic steatohepatitis affect approximately 30% and 5%, respectively, of the US population. 4
  • About 100 million individuals in the United States are estimated to have nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. 4
  • Biliary atresia is a rare disease affecting 1 in 8,000 to 1 in 18,000 live births worldwide. About 10-20% of infants with biliary atresia have abnormalities in other organs, such as heart defects or issues with their spleen. 5
  • Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), is the most common form of liver disease in children and has more than doubled over the past 20 years. 6
  1. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. (2016). Hepatitis C Basic Information. Retrieved from https://www.hhs.gov/hepatitis/learn-about-viral-hepatitis/hepatitis-c-basics/index.html
  2. CDC, Viral Hepatitis – Statistics & Surveillance. (2016) Surveillance for Viral Hepatitis – United States 2014. Retrieved from https://www.cdc.gov/hepatitis/statistics/2014surveillance/commentary.htm#bkgrndC
  3. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. (2016). Hepatitis B Basic Information. Retrieved from https://www.hhs.gov/hepatitis/learn-about-viral-hepatitis/hepatitis-b-basics/index.html
  4. Trust for America’s Health; Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. (2016). Adult obesity in the United States. Retrieved from http://stateofobesity.org/adult-obesity
  5. The Childhood Liver Disease Network. (2017). Biliary Atresia. Retrieved from https://childrennetwork.org/ba.aspx
  6. Schwimmer JB, Deutsch R, Kahen T, Lavine JE, Stanley C, Behling C. Prevalence of fatty liver in children and adolescents. Pediatrics. 2006;118:1388–1393. [PubMed]
  7. United Network of Organ Sharing. Web-based transplant National Data. https://optn.transplant.hrsa.gov/data/view-data-reports/national-data/
  8. National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism. Alcohol Facts and Statistics. Retrieved from https://www.niaaa.nih.gov/alcohol-health/overview-alcohol-consumption/alcohol-facts-and-statistics
  9. John Hopkins Medicine. Gastroenterology and Hepatology. FAQs about Alcoholic Liver Disease. Retrieved from http://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/gastroenterology_hepatology/diseases_conditions/faqs/alcoholic_liver_disease.html
  10. Becker U, Deis A, Sørensen TI, Grønbaek M, Borch-Johnsen K, Müller CF, et al. Prediction of risk of liver disease by alcohol intake, sex, and age: a prospective population study. Hepatology 1996; 23: 1025-1029.
  11. Center for Disease Control and Prevention. (2016). Liver Cancer. Retrieved from https://www.cdc.gov/cancer/liver/

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